11/8/14

Daedelus - Live @ Mezzanine

I’ve been listening to Daedelus since my homie Slouch turned me on to his music back around 2004. That was around the time when Daedelus released his LP Invention which is still one of the most cherished records in my collection. I have heard his work develop and change even as electronic music itself develops and changes. He incorporates a lot of different sounds into his music, but he has a small ensemble of specific samples that regularly crop up: a bassoon, an old-timey piano slightly out of tune, a harp, accordion… Combined with advanced and at times almost hectic time signatures and tempos and you get Daedelus' signature sound. And while I have heard his music described as “grimy Victorian techno”, it ranges from something like that to downtempo to thoughtfully composed little solo pieces. And that’s just his recorded material. His live performance is a special thing in and of itself.

I’ve seen Daedelus live a number of times and had my mind blown by him before. So when I went to see him at Mezzanine, I had an expectation about what I was getting into. I made sure to get to the venue early: for shows like this I like to get all up in that action. His opener Spazzkid did a solid job getting the energy level up. He had a big smile on his face and his jubilant dancing was pretty fun to watch. It was the first time I had heard him, and his music gives me the same feeling as artists like Ryan Hemsworth and Wave Racer: feel good vibes that dip into Nintendo beats, Japanese singing and a sort of clean “happy trap”. I have heard this sound described as “Miami bass”. It’s light, fun, and dance-y.

Spazzkid having some fun with his controller

When Daedelus came on they fired up this big installation set up behind him. It was a series of equally sized square mirrors set up on a rigging that allowed them to pivot in several directions, sometimes in unison but mostly independently in various patterns. Daedelus told us the contraption is called “Archimedes” and that they mostly use it for festivals. What a treat to catch it on the stage of one of my favorite night clubs in San Francisco.

Mr. Darlington himself

Daedelus performs live with a lot of button pushing and finger drumming using a drum machine called a Monome, which interfaces into his lap top. It visually translates into a pretty hands-on performance. Once Daedelus begins his set he plays continuously. He does not stop, and often transitions into different tempos using clever tricks that I have trouble describing in words. There are a few electronic musicians out there whose live performances take you on a journey. Daedelus does this, and can be compared to some of my other favorites live performers: artists like Jon Hopkins, Shpongle, and Shlohmo. Sometimes entrancing, sometimes downtempo, sometimes heavy and almost trap, all the way up to “fast, spazzy, and crazy” as the artist described it to us prior to performing his encore (which used a splendid take on the amen break, if I might add). I found myself getting really hyped up at times, head-banging and karate chopping the air, and in between somehow almost still, looking inwardly, only to be slowly reeled back and lifted back up again.

I recognized a couple of fire remixed incorporated into the Daedelus set. He peppered his signature sound and sequencing into ‘Chimes’, ‘You & Me’, and I even caught some Danny Brown verses mixed in there.

By the end of the set I felt like I had received a deep tissue massage on my brain, which is appropriate as Daedelus’ new album is on the Brainfeeder label. The crowd was delighted and I along with the rest of them screamed and hollered while Daedelus, always the gentleman, bowed and smiled.

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If you liked this blog entry, check out Jon Hopkins - Live @ Mezzanine

10/28/14

Spose - Live @ Bottom of the Hill

Growing up in Portland, Maine there was not a lot of local music that made it onto the national scene. Maine being a sparsely populated place, it is very rare that one of our citizens makes big enough artistic waves to gain any attention beyond the New England region. There are occasional exceptions to this; the two that come to mind are the band the Rustic Overtones and the actress Anna Kendrick. The Rustic Overtones got some national radio play in the late 1990’s, went on a couple of big tours, and made some great music, my favorite song being Feast Or Famine from their 1997 album ‘Rooms by the Hour’. Ms. Kendrick, who is about my age, made her rise in local and regional theater, performed on Broadway, and eventually transitioned to screen acting. Most tweens recognize her as Jessica from the Twilight movies, although my favorite performance of hers is the role of Beca in Pitch Perfect. That’s right, I’ve seen Pitch Perfect.

I went to college in Maine (UMF ’06 represent!) and it was there I befriended a number of kids my age from the town of Wells. Aside from being a uniquely tight knit and interesting bunch, Wells kids have a distinct affinity for hip hop and various elements of its culture. It was in Wells where I first learned what a whip is, how to smoke a backwood, and who T.I. is. When I first got into freestyle rapping, a good deal of it was in the hazy bedrooms of my Wells homies. And one of those homies was named Ryan, who was starting to create music under the moniker Spose.

It didn’t take long for the small-yet-robust Maine hip hop scene to notice Spose. He was loud, confident, and really motivated. He got his name tattooed on his arm and wherever rap nights, battles, or freestyle sessions cropped up Spose was not far away. Spose is one of those kids who always has something clever to say and is probably the smartest person in the room. He has a way of seriously rapping without taking himself seriously. As an artist he is dedicated, always making new music, and consistently finds new ways to stay fresh in a genre sometimes limited by its narrow bandwidth.

In 2010, Spose struck gold with his song ‘I’m Awesome’. It got him a record deal, a music video, and a boost in resources to take his art to the next level. Since then he has toured several times, launched his own music label and line of merchandise, and generally managed to be a professional full time musician in an era where many musicians still have to work a day job.

Recently Spose went back on tour, this time with MC Chris and MC Lars (who is a California native) and they swung through San Francisco for a night to do a show at Bottom of the Hill. Known for its strong docket of indie/underground artists, the venue is aptly named based on the hilly geography of SF, and the fact that it is indeed located at the bottom of one of said hills. Also, it is apparently a large residential house converted and modified over the years to be a music venue/bar. This gives it the reckless charm of a house party and the intimacy of a small underground club.

a cellphy with the crew

A few Maine homies came up from Santa Cruz and down from NorCal to join forces for the show. When we got there the line was huge and Spose was already performing; we could hear him outside as we waited in line, and I demonstrated how cool I was/killed time by rapping along to ‘I’m Awesome’ outside on the sidewalk. Once inside we plowed our way to the front, cheap beer in hand, and jammed out with as much exuberance as could be afforded to a homie who had toured all the way from Maine to California to share his music with the country.

Spose engages the audience

Spose did not disappoint, blending his familiar half-joking honesty with precise rhyme-schemes and word play. He is incredibly well rehearsed and does not at any point fuck up. He sometimes commits the common faux-paux of explaining what his songs are about before performing them, but he does so in an endearing way that adds to the storytelling element of hip hop. All around us were hordes of young strangers who were completely into it, many were screaming the lyrics right back at the artist, nodding their heads, waving their hands, and generally having a great time seeing an artist they love.

Looking back at those bedroom freestlyes so long ago, I thought about all that had transpired for Spose to finally end up on that stage in San Francisco. The memories put a smile on my face that didn’t go away all night (admittedly part of that might have been the tidal wave of Budweiser I consumed). It felt like a little slice of Maine that night, with all the homies in California coming together to see Spose and hang out with friends.

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If you liked this blog entry, check out Lil Dicky - Live @ the Independent

10/27/14

Brick + Mortar - Live @ Slim's

A while back I was listening to a mixtape by Plaid and somewhere around the seven and a half minute mark a song came on that kinda blew my mind. The vocals were pumped through some kind of low-fi/garage rock filter, the drumming was supremely boom-bap, and the lyrics had the profound-yet-jovial tone of someone like The Squirrel Nut Zippers.

Turns out that song is called ‘Move To The Ocean’ and in my opinion it’s a damn masterpiece. So when shortly after learning about that track I discovered the artists were coming so SF, I was floored.
Their name is Brick + Mortar and they are from New Jersey. I bought two tickets and when my original man-date was double booked I described them to my homie Alex as “sort of an alt-rock, garage-rock hybrid” which is another way of saying what I said in the first paragraph without admitting that these guys are too far ahead of their time to be defined. Needless to say Alex accepted my invitation and even bought me a drink once we got to the venue.

After Brick + Mortar played for a bit, I couldn't help but label their sound as “austere.” Robust, well-crafted verses built up to strong choral waves, with drum breaks and bridges reminiscent of Billy Martin. Never before have I heard music that harnesses golden-age hip-hop drums with tasty live guitar and conscious if not profound vocals delivered in the style of rock.

Being the opener for Vacationer, the only people at the venue (Slim’s) in time to witness these dudes were either a) there to drink and enjoy what the venue had to offer, or b) familiar with the band and willing to be punctual in order to catch their live set. So basically we’re talking about thirty people in a city known for its musical taste.

No matter; really. These guys are way ahead of their time and truly talented. Knowing only one of their songs, it was easy to enjoy their set, key in on their lyrics, and absorb their sound as something I’ve been seeking for a while and just recently found.

small potatoes will still make you a large fry

Over the course of six songs they utilized three or four dozen samples pre-sequenced such that the drummer could provide live accompaniment in a way that gave the duo a much larger sound than two men could hope to achieve. Such is the beauty of the sampler, the sequencer, and the drum machine. I truly appreciate that this is a component of their craft.

The overall result exceeded my expectations and left me wanting more. Except for some rare 7” I’ve heard rumors about, there is no available vinyl as they are not yet on a big enough label to publish. What I did get was a rare and intimate experience with a band that is surely headed upwards in mountainous fashion. It was an absolute treat and delight to catch Brick + Mortar at Slim’s, and if I’m even somewhat accurate in my takeaway, the next time I see these guys it will be at the Independent and they’ll be the headliners.

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If you liked this blog entry, check out Jon Hopkins - Live @ Mezzanine

9/18/14

Lil Dicky - Live @ The Independent

I expected seeing Lil Dicky on Tuesday at the Independent was going to be one big $15 dick joke. What I saw was hilarious and also transcended the role of the modern white guy rapper.

I have and will always be a fan of underground hip-hop, which has consistently had many white emcees. Slug, Aesop Rock, Sage Francis, Sole, ADeeM, Buck 65, and Dose One come to mind as immediate examples. But I think that on the bigger scale, it’s important to give a lot of credit to Eminem, because he was the first white guy to do it and get really, really popular, and thus shift the paradigm of what a white guy rapper can do.

Eminem was funny in a sick way, all anger and angst that was easily relatable to many young white men (such as myself) who were fans of rap in general. Eminem was so good that his appeal exceeded his genre, and I remember growing up hearing his songs on the Alternative Rock radio station. I like to think that Eminem paved the way for many of the white rappers who came after him; because Eminem proved that you didn’t have to be black to be a legit big-time rapper.

A friend of mine, a white guy rapper named Spose, experienced not-insignificant success a few years back with his song “I’m Awesome”. Spose used self-depreciating humor, championing the self-loathing white guy guilt that for me (and many young men like me) is relatable and recognizable. I can listen to 50 Cent and see how he feels, or I can listen to Spose and know how he feels.

As expected, a couple of other talented white guys were working the same angle as Spose. Jon Lajoie (“Everyday Normal Guy”), Asher Roth (“I Love College”), and Adam Samberg/The Lonely Island (“Threw It On The Ground”) all come to mind. These were slightly different takes on the same perspective: being white and owning up to all of the lack-luster stereotypes associated with it. Average sexual performance, not being a baller, being slightly above average at a few average things, generally lacking confidence, having “first world problems”… these themes are echoed in the collective works of the aforementioned artists. And yet they are spoken in the language of the hip-hop emcee, which means (and I credit Method Man for this definition) flow, breath control, and lyrical wordplay. So now here we have Lil Dicky, who is doing the same thing, but he is doing it in the best way I have witnessed so far.


photo by instagram user monicamariedeus

To get a solid idea of Dicky’s particular brand of white guy rapper flavor, check out “White Dude”, which is about all of the good parts of being a white male. He poses them hilariously, and his rhyme schemes and wordplay are clever and on point. Plus he filmed parts of it in San Francisco so that’s cool. Dig a little deeper into Dicky’s impressive and well-maintained online presence and you see the white guy complex branching into other things more specific to Dicky himself: being a Jew and using the “K-word” the way black people use the N-word, being physically overshadowed by other more handsome white guys, and being a funny white rapper that is also a technically talented lyricist are some of the main themes he highlights, each with their own song and music video featured on his regularly updated Youtube channel.

Dicky's set was highly interactive with the audience

Lil Dicky put on a hip-hop performance Tuesday night. Yes, it had humorous elements. Yes, it built on white guy stereotypes. But by the end of it I felt like I had witnessed a rap show and not a comedy routine. A good rap show features a couple of things. First, you need a great DJ who properly backs up the emcee. In this case DJ Omega not only backed him up but opened for him in a very live and high energy display. It was very simple but very well done. When Dicky came on, he put up a power point presentation, outlining the amount of fun the audience was about to have. To me this was genius. A hip-hop show should be fun. Dicky threw in some jokes, but when it came time to rap, he threw down. He was live on the mic. He had every word dialed, with excellent flow and breath control, never running out of steam or fumbling with his lyrics. When he brought up his hype man, a totally swagged-out black kid, he joked “how cool do I look now with this guy on stage next to me?” The beats were well produced and trappy, and Dicky had the lyrical talent to hold it down. So while he joked about having a small dick, and took off his pants, and brought up a girl on stage and gave her a lap dance, he also reiterated that he “is a professional rapper”, he kept the crowd engaged and responding with tons of energy, and he held down the stage with the same presence and strength I can attribute to other very successful rappers I have seen (and I have been to many, many hip hop shows).

There’s no doubt in my mind that Lil Dicky is going places. It was great to catch him on an otherwise mellow Tuesday night, and I was reminded just how much I enjoy hip-hop when it’s done right.

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If you liked this blog entry, check out Jon Hopkins Live @ Mezzanine

7/25/14

Jon Hopkins - Live @ Mezzanine

Recently I went to see Jon Hopkins at Mezzanine with my buddy Shingo. I’ve been a fan of Hopkins for about a year and a half now. His music has a wonderfully natural way of building up and entrancing the listener, taking your mind far away to a different place and time, or perhaps, to a difference place and time within your own mind. I find it excellent for long runs. Very deep, advanced stuff. So to say I was excited to see him live is an understatement.

We got there pretty early, a little bit after doors opened as not to miss anything and also grab a good close spot on the main floor. It’s fun to see all of the people enter the club and feel the energy and anticipation build.

Teebs, the opener, was ayt; I’ve heard some his stuff on his soundcloud so it was cool to catch him live. The floor was a little empty during the set, with lots of people still filing in and getting their drinks at the bar. He happily played a few tunes (he seemed like a nice and happy dude) and then the stage went dark for an interlude. This is when people started packing the dance floor in anticipation of the headliner.

Jon Hopkins came on to much applause and palpable eagerness from the audience. As the stage lights lit him, a young man standing near me said “oh my god he’s so handsome.” It’s true, Hopkins has cut features and dashing looks, but electronic music isn’t about how hot you are, it’s about how hot you sound.
Hopkins did not disappoint.

He started out kind of mellow, letting the audience settle in at their own pace. Slowly things accelerated and like a waking dream my mind’s eye started to create imagery for what I was hearing. I gently rocked to the rhythm, eyes closed, and Shingo leaned in and said “a woman walking down a hallway in a fluttering dress, except instead of walls there are trains moving in opposite directions.” This was a pretty spot on way to describe what I was seeing and hearing: layers of consistent movement around a central set of drums forming a structure that moved like curtains in a light breeze. Fluttering, developing, deepening…

photo by Instagram user yungpeng

All around me everyone I saw was on the same level. Hopkins was making magic, entrancing us, and just as we began to settle into a singular groove, he began increasing the energy level. Before you knew it everyone was moving along with the beats, with some of the more enthusiastic audience members jumping around a little bit. The beats became more austere, pronounced, powerful. It felt more like something you could move to, and so I moved. Shingo leaned in and said, “Fog over trees with bare branches.”

Carefully Hopkins began to build his masterpiece right before our eyes and ears. With incredible detail and technical prowess he started a long crescendo. Tempos increased, samples got wilder, layers thickened. I felt somehow taken by this music, energized and hypnotized and captured by it, at one moment in a trance and then without realizing it jumping for joy. I have only experienced this specific sensation once before, back in March when I saw Shpongle at the Regency.

The performance was thrilling to witness and by the time his encore was done Hopkins had played for a perfect hour and five minutes to the delight of the crowd. After high-fiving some fellow enthusiastic audience members, we got the hell out of there, in an awed state of disbelief of what we had just experienced. I love having my mind blown.

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If you liked this blog entry, check out World Cup Thoughts

7/24/14

World Cup Thoughts

Every four years I’m reminded of the prevalence of the World’s favorite sport: Football. As an American sports fan distracted by the NFL and NBA, the World Cup takes care of my soccer-watching quota with a month long megadose once every four years. It’s like the Olympics without footage of curling gently lulling me to sleep every night.

To get super bandwagon hyped for the World Cup I actually went and watched a real soccer match. I saw the USMNT (Team America) take down Team Azerbaijan (which Wikipedia tells me is a real place) at Candlestick Park. We won the game as expected, and my wallet also celebrated the victory of how much money I didn’t have to spend on beer since I smuggled in my own pint of Bacardi!

Since I love fantasy sports even more than the real versions of them, I had to do an ESPN bracket predictor with my fellow soccer know-nothings. I picked Holland to win because I am a quarter Dutch (thanks Oma!) and also they have this guy who looks like Professor X. Then at the last minute I pussed out and changed my pick to Brazil like everyone else. This switch resulted in a total TIFU moment when Holland beat the living crap out of Spain in the first game of the tournament.

In an effort to continue my bandwagon support for Team America I bought this Betabrand USA Ping-Pong Polo which also ended up allowing me to wear Dutch colors after I remembered what their flag looked like. Team America did pretty good, playing their way out of THE GROUP OF DEATH in a combination of wins/ties/losses and goals scored/allowed that was almost as confusing as the wildcard scenarios the NFL Network starts drawing up around Week 15. Then they lost and we were out of the tournament but it’s cool because everybody loves waffles and Stella Artois (not mixed together). Netherlands played all the way to winning the 3rd place matchup, but they probably should have been in the final because they really seemed to outplay Argentina in the semis (although this probably wouldn’t have mattered because [SPOILER ALERT] Germany had an army of handsome cyborgs that didn’t lose a single match the entire tournament).

I heard a lot of people complaining about the amount of dives you see in soccer, but really it’s exactly like Football: someone hits the ground and play stops. Maybe instead of stopping the clock they just let it run and add time onto it later or whatever but it basically achieves stoppage of play: an opportunity for players to rest while advertising companies assault the TV viewers with commercials. Except that in soccer they just show you the player rolling around on the ground for a while, and then maybe a doctor jogs over and douses his leg with MAGIC SPRAY. There is no commercial break signaling that it’s time to pee or look at your phone. That took a little getting used to, but fortunately there is still a half time (though lacking a proper live spectacle featuring a pop musician and medley style presentation of their body of work).

It’s not diving that is soccer’s weakness, it’s the scoring celebrations. Touchdown celebrations are way better. Gronk spikes, Graham dunks and Ochocinco does everything else imaginable. All they do in soccer is the sliding onto your knees thing, a celebration so passé here in America that even at weddings it’s only cool to do once or else you become “that guy.”



I thoroughly enjoyed the World Cup, both as an excuse to binge-eat guacamole and as a sporting event. The scoring was exciting and the elite level of play was outdone only by the voguish hairstyles worn by athletes of a sport so beloved the rest of the world is on a first-name basis with them. Until next time I’ll take another four years of helmet-head and some good old fashioned beer commercials.

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If you liked this blog entry, check out Jon Hopkins Live @ Mezzanine

8/16/12

Astronautalis - Somethin For the Kids aka Donuts lyrics

Me and Tupac Shakur
Sat inside a donut shop sharing a dozen
And watching the coffee cool
One by one the box slowly emptied
From the cakes to the crullers and at last the fancies
Pac sighed aloud so I could hear him
"Donuts are communism"
I asked him "Why?"
He said "Better in theory."
We laughed and scratched the sleep from our eyes
He said "This is ridiculous. Twelve is too much; half a dozen wastes our time."
But every time we order twelve thinking we can handle it
And every time we end up pissed because we made our stomachs sick
We both laugh a bit and gingerly sip our coffee
His fingers scrape the table top and he digs in softly
And I watch him there
Carving, scraping, both sitting in silence
As he engraves his name with the word Westside beside it
Underneath the orange veneer of the donut shop gear
There's an earthy brown flesh that excavation makes appear
Year after year Pac and I return there
To the table that he claimed with the magic bench chairs
Chug the last of our coffee and stand to leave
Wave to the clerk, she says goodbye in Chinese
Clutching our sick stomachs we both struggle to speak
Shake our hands, split our ways
And say, "Seeya next week."






RiFF RAFF - TiME lyrics


It’s called time people
And if you don’t slow down and realize what you’re doing
You might lose everything

Cuz time goes by              Cuz time goes by
And it goes on                   And it goes on
And it don’t stop              And it don’t stop

Sometimes I feel
I feel like my time has passed
Like an hourglass
And the sand is movin fast

In this life I live
My Dad is my best friend
But it seems like I never call him
Unless I need some money

The people around me
I mean the ones that I do have
It’s like they’re here today
They’ll probly be gone tomorrow

When it’s raining hard
And my car breaks down
I got no one to call on
Except triple A

Cuz time goes by              Cuz time goes by
And it goes on                   And it goes on
And it don’t stop              And it don’t stop

Here we go again
In my life all alone again
I got no wife
I got no kids

No one to come home to
No one to cook for me
Hell, when I’m sick
It’s a catastrophe

My days are slow
And my nights are cold
And to go to sleep
I gotta keep the TV on

 My ex gal still call me private
She ask me if I’m doin fine
But she has a daughter
And the baby aint mine

Cuz time goes by              Cuz time goes by
And it goes on                   And it goes on
And it don’t stop              And it don’t stop

Through all my time upon this earth
They told me what I couldn’t make
Now I gotta put it in their face

Was on my grind, just a waste of time
I think that they’re hearing me
They don’t wanna really deal with me

Through all these years, from what I’ve seen
I’ve had friends steal from me
Same ones who lived with me

When I got grown and dropped out of school
Nobody was broke with me
Now they all wanna roll with me

Cuz time goes by              Cuz time goes by
And it goes on                   And it goes on
And it don’t stop              And it don’t stop


12/15/11

Metta World Cheese

6/18/10

new edit for iSlouch video

So I have this good friend Jake who lives in Portland, Maine, where he, among other things, produces wonderful beats using an SP-1200. The SP-1200 is a drum machine/sampler made by EMU in the early 1990s (or late 80's maybe even) and features 8-bits of processing power (like an original Nintendo). This drum machine was used by such greats as Pete Rock and J Dilla. It is still used today by saavy instrumental hip hop enthusiasts who seek the dirty dirty raw sound the SP creates. Jake uses one and makes beats under the name iSlouch. He makes all sorts of beats for all sorts of things but my favorites are the ones he makes with the intention of performing them live. He structures the sequence and sets up the pads such that his mighty magic fingers can play the beat in real time, creating what I would consider one of the most impressive and engaging styles of live music. I have seen a few people do this, including Jel and Odd Nosdam, and iSlouch can definitely hang with those guys.

Last summer I filmed iSlouch and another pal of mine, AdamB, doing some live stuff on their drum machines. It took a whole year of slacking but finally I got around to editing a bit of the footage into a "music video" of sorts. We ghetto-ly hung a green sheet behind the performers, which I later removed in Adobe Premier Pro using a color key video effect. Actually I used about 37 color keys. It took a long time and made my computer grumpy. Once I isolated the video footage of just Jake playing the SP, I was able to basically superimpose it into a series of simple animations that I also painstakingly assembled in Premier. The final result is this video you see right here. The sound is taken directly from the mic on the camera, so you can hear his fingers slapping the old school, Nintendo-plastic pads on the SP.

The song is called "Star Charred Baby Smile" and is one of my all-time favorites.


The edited timeline in Premier: Lots of layers!

2/12/08

Donuts

Me and Tupac Shakur
Sat inside a donut shop sharing a dozen
And watching the coffee cool
One by one the box slowly emptied
From the cakes to the crullers and at last the fancies
Pac sighed aloud so I could hear him
"Donuts are communism"
I asked him "Why?"
He said "Better in theory."
We laughed and scratched the sleep from our eyes
He said "This is ridiculous. Twelve is too much; half a dozen wastes our time."
But every time we order twelve thinking we can handle it
And every time we end up pissed because we made our stomachs sick
We both laugh a bit and gingerly sip our coffee
His fingers scrape the table top and he digs in softly
And I watch him there
Carving, scraping, both sitting in silence
As he engraves his name with the word Westside beside it
Underneath the orange veneer of the donut shop gear
There's an earthy brown flesh that excavation makes appear
Year after year Pac and I return there
To the table that he claimed with the magic bench chairs
Chug the last of our coffee and stand to leave
Wave to the clerk, she says goodbye in Chinese
Clutching our sick stomachs we both struggle to speak
Shake our hands, split our ways
And say, "Seeya next week."

-- astronautalis
My photo
San Francisco, California, United States

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